Puli Ilkaringuru (H5) and Ischgl (LL6) added

Puli Ilkaringuru is a H5 chondrite which fell in 2019 and was later found by the Australian Desert Fireball Network team. There is no paper yet, the orbital data are derived from the values given in the MetBull database, therefore, both the argument of perihelion and the longitude of the ascending node are not available (similar to the situation with Al-Khaddaf, Oman). I will add these values once properly published in a peer reviewed journal.

Ischgl (LL6) is a meteorite found in 1976 near the austrian village of Ischgl (close to the border with Switzerland). Only recently was it realized that a large fireball had terminated in the area, just a few years earlier, in 1970. A new publication by Gritsevich et al. suggests that this fireball is a very likely source for the Ischgl meteorite: it matches both the mass of the recovered meteorite, its find location and pristine condition. Also, the cosmogenic radionuclide and noble gas inventory of Ischgl can be brought into agreement with the inferred pre-atmospheric mass. This makes Ischgl the third-oldest meteorite (in historical sequence) with an orbit, predating the Innisfree fall by 7 years.

Full disclosure: I am a co-author on the Ischgl paper.

Santa Filomena (H5-6), Ådalen (Iron) and Al-Khadhaf (H5-6) added

I have added three new meteorites to the list, which now lists 49 meteorites with published orbits. Santa Filomena (Tosi et al., 2023, MAPS) is a H5-6 fallen in Brazil in 2020, which has a considerable recovered mass (80 kg). Ådalen (Kyrylenko et al., 2023, ApJ), from Sweden, is the first iron meteorite with an orbit. Unfortunately, an ownership dispute (see e.g. here: Karmaka.de), now in appeal, still stands in the way of a detailed analysis of the meteorite, inlcuding the exact type and its publication in a Meteoritical Bulletin (I’ll note here that given the soon-to-launch mission to 16 Pysche, it would be very interesting to know more about the orbits of iron meteorites). Finally, Al-Khadhaf (H5-6; MetBull 112), with a very small recovered mass (ca. 22 g), is the first meteorite found with the help of a new camera network recently installed in Oman.